Author Archives: KiheBard

About KiheBard

Been writing one thing or another since I was, um, kinda young. Yup, I come by the gray hair & beard honestly (three boys, an ex-wife, various other people in my life, and now being a Granfaw), although it has become thinner and whiter since my normal profile pic was taken. By training, I am a geek or something like it (degree in Psychology, 30+ years as a professional computer analyst / programmer / project manager) who would have been a historian if he could have figured out a decent way to make a living at it other than teaching college. Would have been a physicist but kept bouncing off the second calculus course. History is a serious hobby in more than one sense (I am a wargamer and also a member/participant of the Society for Creative Anachronism, meaning among other things being a calligrapher, herald, cook, armorer, costumer, fencer, embroiderer, researcher, lecturer, perpetual student, and bard). Yes, I have paid writing credits. Yes, I have unpaid writing credits, too. I write a little of this, a little of that, and a whole lot of the other. Game scenarios (Star Fleet Battles, Starfire, D&D) brought me my first pay for writing. I wrote an activism column for a human rights magazine some years ago, and also served as editorial assistant for the same (including quick-we-gotta-have-a-cover calligraphy for cover art, reading slush, copy editing, convention attendance, etc.). I have had an article on the writing of corporeal undead published (twice, that I know of...). I have written / submitted / even have some published fantasy, science fiction, science fantasy, dark fantasy, documentation, a technical glossary, articles, commentaries, ceremonies, collections, poetry, blogs, websites, and even "pure" essays. And filk. Can't forget the filk. I also sharpen knives, and wits. WIP: Life! and, as far as writing goes, Destiny Reach (series of tales sharing same universe; ten major installments generated through NaNoWriMo plus more backstory than I ever expect to use [none yet published]) RPG Environment(S) including fiction using the same setting(s) Anything else that attracts my attention long enough to put pen to paper (or fingers to keyboard) Respectfully, Mike C. Baker (Curmudgeon-in-Training) Mike/Kihe/Amra AKA Rev. Kihe Blackeagle PULC (the DreamSinger Bard) SKA al-Sayyid Amr ibn Majid al-Bakri al-Amra (OSCA, F.o.B.) Opinions? I'm FULL of them!

Something’s Going On ‘Round Here

I’ve been quiet on-line recently.  Scrambling to survive can rake up a lot of energy, denying it for creative purposes other than furthering survival.

To quote a favorite line from a broadcast personality:  Can we say “Whee” now?  (Bless you, Benny Hill, wherever you are…)

Really.  We have a roof for now.  We have food for a week or more, even if not of a type or with a variety to please both of us.  BUT the challenges are piling up taller, deeper, and darker.  Does make it difficult to write cheerfully positive viewpoints, although some of the darker futures I have envisioned over the years are already getting far too much reinforcement from the political front these days.  (The work on “Tales of the Apocalypse Decade” had to be suspended when I saw where some of the storylines were headed in the face of the ill wind out of Washington D.C. …)

I’ve not updated this blog in far too long.  Distractions and realities of navigating end-of-life care for family members took their own toll.  Added to that was the challenge of assisting my partner’s family as they prepared the house (we’d lived in it with her family as they declined) for disposition.  No small task:  they’d been there for more than thirty years, and there were family records and “stuff” going back at least fifty beyond that even ignoring some of the genealogical records and family history.

We were exhausted by the process, which was made worse by conflicting points of view about the needs of preserving financial records for the estate.  It saddened me considerably to have more than one adult who should have known better advocate for the wholesale destruction of records that legally the estate is bound to preserve by law and / or IRS rules.  My brain suffered whiplash in the process, I tell you true!  (As later matters have developed, even some of what we did manage to preserve has been lost, but we could not have known that at the time.)

Then there’s the small matter of lacking income since.  Declining health has not helped with the writing or the employment search either.  Only so much energy remains after days of dealing with Texas heat, mountains of sometimes crumbling paper, and emotional disruptions.  Health demands a toll, and takes payments from you even when you have nothing in reserve to make those payments.  (Human biochemistry has a VERY efficient collection agent in these matters, a mechanism that is relentless and not easily bribed or mollified.)

So.  What’s next?  We don’t know yet.  Even once we find out, there could be interesting twists and turns before, during, and after the revelations are made.  No doubt interesting to those directly affected, maybe not so much to others.

And THAT, my putative readers, is Life with a capital L.

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“Six days shalt thou work …

and do all thou art able (on the seventh the same, and sweep out the stable)”

One doggedly persistent concept that keeps getting knocked about and kicked in the shins is the legendary 40-hour work week.  Legendary, because there are documentable instances of individuals who have achieved and maintained such a lofty goal (it would be mythical if no mortal being could achieve such a condition).  Knocked about and kicked where it hurts because for the vast majority of people I am aware of the work nearly always exceeds the limits of five days at eight hours each.

Usually more like a minimum of nine hours each day for six days out of seven, and something more than that on at least one additional day.

Where’s my proof, you ask?  Consider the modern “knowledge worker”, required by an employer to inhabit an office for purposes of control and security (we’ll come back to the security aspect in a bit…).  Is our paragon of productivity housed on-location?  Almost certainly not, so we add a required commute to the office and back again to the living quarters.  Let’s be generous and only give Paragon thirty minutes for each leg of the commute.  We’ll stick with the 8-to-5 daily schedule, with an assumption of one hour allowance each day for lunch or other personal (non-work) break.  Now, factor in the expectation for accessibility 24x7x363 — we’ll be generous in this exercise and designate Thanksgiving Day and Christmas Day as non-working holidays.  Include the probable requirement for mandatory-in-all-but-name company functions at night or on weekends:  holiday “parties”, “retreats”, “volunteer opportunities”, etc.

We’ll allow half-credit for vacation time actually scheduled and taken (full credit only if no expectation exists for the vacationing worker to check email, remain reachable by telephone, or be on conference calls during the time away from the office).  Additional kudos and partial credit for coffee breaks, with double credit if the business provides the coffee / tea / snack service and reduced credit if pay is deducted automatically whether or not Paragon actually drinks coffee.  (We’ll remain neutral on “smoke breaks” for now, OK?)

Wipe out three-quarters of any credits otherwise earned by the workplace if the current workload requires “take-home” work, reduces available training time during the normal workday, or makes overtime hours mandatory outside of traditional “busy season” timeframes.

Calculators at the ready?  Naw, no real need to add to brain-strain.  If you can find a modern, effective, productive knowledge worker who spends less than 50 hours a week in work-related activity, show me where they are working — I wanna apply there!

Bad news, and there is some:  a “creative” worker on average will be logging something closer to 70 or 80 hours in that same week in order to produce anything like an equivalent income.  Maybe more, if they are conducting their own marketing efforts.

There are REASONS that people are reporting more fatigue in their lives now than in my parent’s generation.  You wanna try and legislate a “living wage” and in all likelihood take away good entry-level jobs from the available pool?  Good luck, my friend, and in the most direct Southern manner “Bless your heart”.

Yer gonna need every advantage you can get when the villagers show up with the “bricked” cellphones they can’t pay for and the burning-resume torches for the jobs you just made disappear.

The Broken Hero

Heroes is as heroes does … and sometimes as they does not!

According To Hoyt

Years ago, in a science fiction short story, I came across this expression that just fit my feelings. “Born owing money.”

I think from the way it was employed in the story that it was supposed to mean “from a poor family” but that’s not how I felt it. For me, from as far back as I can remember, I had this feeling I must justify my existence.

As the half (one half the family) unwanted child who then proceeded to near-bankrupt her family because she had every-possible-illness and some that technically, logically, should be impossible, this is perhaps understandable.

I was if not born broken, born to be broken. From the moment I remember I’ve been running so hard because I know what’s behind me: me. I know all my tendency to sloth and to malingering. I know the crazy depressive spins. And I know the malice and spitefulness…

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Story-Time, and the Tradition of the Insta-Filk

I am, among other things, a filker.  (Think folk-singer with the parody bit stuck on “on”, or look it up — with the quick alternative definition being an album title associated with Leslie Fish, Folk Songs For Folk Who Haven’t Been Born Yet.)  Sometimes, an existing song begs for new words.  SCREAMS for them, at least inside my head. Within the filk community there’s a name for these first fruits of the filk process, composed on the spur of the moment:  insta-filk. Now, “pure” instafilk typically happens in the first (very) short while after the inspiration is received or experienced.  What follows below is an example of another type, in that I had heard the original song years ago, and the original parody http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hbT5FFgmvuo&list=PL5DFA46EF9A9CC56B&feature=share&index=20 more than once recently.  The Muses kick us in our butts when and how THEY choose to, however…  Note, also, that instafilk may not be a  100% match to the tune or scansion of the original.  Sorry, by part and parcel of the form consider most instafilk as “Work In Progress”.   nearlyInstaFilk: Story-time TTTO (very roughly) “The Ballad of Canton” cf. _Firefly_, wherein Jayne discovers himself proclaimed a Hero… see also “The Man They Call Joss”, as performed by The Bedlam Bards NewWords: Kihe Blackeagle

Bucks! Fools see only those bucks!

The fandoms of skiffy and high fantasy Number now quite some millions, but fools only see Division and doubting and pocketbooks deep While deriding the fanboys upon where they sleep.

We are here for the story, heros and villains too We will stay for good stories, so now OUT with “grey goo” Remember you hosers with those purse-strings pulled tight What one opening new “Star Wars” pulls in in one night.

Now is it still worthwhile ’cause of label’s bright shine? Only with story will they hold onto my dime. Say what you will, sirs, yet harken to me: Put back stories in movies or watch our feet flee.

Bad Language

Sarah Hoyt was born and raised in Portugal, and now lives in the USA — and makes a living from writing *in English*. Her thoughts upon the nature and history of language as it has evolved among humans (specifically Homo sapiens sapiens) AND why the “universal translator” is a Bad Idea are well worth consideration by ANYONE who must deal with differences in the way we communicate with one another.

And that means Every. Single. One. of us who use the Internet, or make a meaningful living from the exchange of goods, services — and words.

According To Hoyt

Come closer. Yes, you. Come here. Listen to me. Do you hear what I’m saying? Do you understand it?

I bet you don’t, or not quite as I mean it.

Look, a recent alleged science fiction read had nanocites that adapted people to speak a universal language.

Why is it that languages get no respect when it comes to world building and future projection? Oh, it’s not a science in the sense it’s not predictive. (No, I don’t even care if some colleges consider them almost a science – mine did) but it’s a science in the sense of analysis collection and observation.

Is it because we don’t have math? (We do, you know? It’s just weird and done with different symbols.) Or is it because to paraphrase Pride and Prejudice “Any savage can talk?”

I do understand the unique difficulties of writing future language or past language for that…

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My Name Is Inigo Montoya!

Straight re-blog. Warts and all, I *like* Heinlein.

“Specialization is for insects.”

According To Hoyt

*So, yes, this is a SORTA blast from the past post — but it’s one that wasn’t published here, but at The Lensman’s Children as a guest post in October 2010.  I apologize for doing a repeat post of sorts, but Through Fire has FINALLY started coming together and I’m up to my eyeballs in it.  And then again, I started feeling I needed to do a post on what Heinlein meant to me, because some people are talking a lot of insanity about the poor man, who is not alive to defend himself.  But there’s really nothing I want to say about Heinlein which I didn’t say in this essay.  And so here it is.  A reprint and not a reprint, and some of you might have missed it, so…

UPDATE: since this was written in those days of halcyon sanity four years ago, I feel compelled to clarify…

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